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Street Art And Inclusion From A Female Street Artist In Ōtautahi Christchurch

Street artist Kophie Hulsbosch – AKA Meep – is emblematic of the street art scene in Ōtautahi Christchurch.

As FLARE Street Art Festival continues to solidify the city’s status as a global Street Art Capital (a moniker given to Christchurch by Lonely Planet in 2017), we chatted to Meep as she transformed a wall canvas in The Welder car park on Welles St.

“Graffiti is an expression of self and building the street art culture actively promotes alternative narratives, diversity in representation and leaves a real legacy on our place,” she said.

Graffiti is an expression of self and building the street art culture actively promotes alternative narratives, diversity in representation and leaves a real legacy on our place."

Kophie Hulsbosch

Her piece is one of seven large-scale murals being created as part of FLARE, an event intended to develop the city’s identity as a creative hub through murals and iconic art pieces helping shape and define the city centre.

Meep is a graphic design entrepreneur with a colourful past in street art, and a champion for diversity and inclusion in art. You can find her work at Shaka Bros Riverside venue, the Berlin Wall on Manchester St, the Box Quarter, at the University of Canterbury and Barefoot Café. 

Speaking from atop her scissor lift on Welles St, she explained the giant 15 x 12 metre mural’s significance.   

“It’s called Music is My Friend – an ode to music and a bit of a love letter to musicians and their art form,” she said.

“I wanted a visible way to show how music supported me and my generation through the pandemic and the last two years of Covid disruption.”  

It’s called Music is My Friend – an ode to music and a bit of a love letter to musicians and their art form 

I wanted a visible way to show how music supported me and my generation through the pandemic and the last two years of Covid disruption."

Kophie Hulsbosch

Kophie Hulsboch

Like many in the industry, she’s experienced her fair share of disruption both as a graphic designer and entrepreneur running the sustainable label The Conscious Club – based on ecologically friendly fashion and business events.

She’s big on the importance of women’s art being seen in Ōtautahi Christchurch. She’s actively encouraging all wahine to join painting workshops as part of the festival, to create more pathways for Māori and Pasifika wahine to get into art careers.

For an in-depth look at the festival, the artists involved, revised event programme, maps to explore and more, visit:  FLARE Street Art Festival | March—2022 

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